Members | Sign In
Painting Tabled Forum > The Painting Table
avatar

Keep on Paintin! Peyton's Painting Projects

posted Apr 09, 2012 12:31:26 by Peyton
Always sounds like you guys are saying my name at the end of the show!

Anyhoo, here's the first demigryph i've managed to finish, there's so much detail on these models it's insane! The knight is being painted seperately and will be glued on later:








Cheers

Peyton
[Last edited Apr 09, 2012 12:33:00]
page   first prev 1 2 3 4 5 next last
74 replies
avatar
Peyton said Aug 30, 2012 13:54:14
Thanks for the disparaging comments guys!

Red and tan is Nurgle now? Those chaos gods and their ever changing fashion trends. I'm kind of winging it with these guys since I haven't been able to find much fluff regarding chaos orks. The plan is for them to be mutuated by chaos (hence the horn,tongue, extended jaw and skin marks), and to be followers of Khorne. Does Khorne have any specific mutations?

Cheers

Peyton
avatar
Gargobot said Aug 30, 2012 22:33:26
You're welcome. :P

The colors of Khorne are black, red and brass iirc. Typical Khorne mutations involve two horns (often ram-like), dog-like features and over-proportioned musculature. Khorne is also secretly into the whole S&M thing, dog-collars and everything. (Well he's also pretty closeted so only dog-collars really - he likes it spiky though!)
avatar
Peyton said Aug 31, 2012 01:23:17
Khorne's a dirty birdy! Yikes! Well the orks have got the muscles and canines down, I think I'll stick with the random mutations though. They're trying to be chaosy, they really are, they're just getting real weird with it.
avatar
Peyton said Sep 10, 2012 12:39:10
Hey all,

PIP of Dirty Birdy the Griffon, and a 40k Chaos cultist:









Cheers

Peyton
avatar
Greg2thePerson said Sep 13, 2012 00:03:19
To quote Jeff, "ka-KAAAAWWWW!"

The dirty birdy is looking dank. I love the white feathers. Good luck with those wings...
The slightly less beautiful host.
avatar
Peyton said Sep 22, 2012 04:12:24
Hey all,

Scrambling to finish stuff for this tournie, I still have plenty to do on the griffon, so here's some PIP shots:

Finished the right wing:



Lord Reginald Sourbottom, Lv.4 Light Wizard PIP:




And Reginald's attendants (objective markers for the tournament)




Greg: KAKAAAAW! It only took me 20 hours to finish one!
avatar
Greg2thePerson said Sep 22, 2012 12:57:47
Holy s***! Those models are fantastic - some of your best work to be sure! Lord Reginald Sourbottom's book is the icing on the cake. ;-)

I think I know who is going to get my Player's Choice vote IF he finishes his army...
The slightly less beautiful host.
avatar
MichaelJordal said Sep 24, 2012 01:06:26
I love the light wizard
avatar
ScottMorgan said Sep 24, 2012 20:44:09
Some really nice looking stuff you've got in process! The Griffon's head in particular looks really sharp; there's a obvious improvement over time in this thread, which is always great to see. One suggestion and one word of caution:

Suggestion - consider, if it's not already too late, of introducing a color difference in one of the griffon's feather ridges. You've got some really nice work pulling out the details, but when they're done it might look a bit monotone when you stand back from it. Most birds have a good amount of variation in their plumage, even if they are a single overall color (http://www.boeing.com/companyoffices/aboutus/wonder_of_flight/images/birdwing_lg.jpg is a good example of some tonal changes you might be able to work in with just a bit of wash work on top of what you've already done).

Word of Caution - I see you're really embracing the style that's become somewhat popular over the last few years of doing a strong highlight stroke along edges and raised areas. On the one hand, it's nice because it's a technique that makes minis pop a lot easier when viewed from a distance and it's a lot easier / less time consuming then progressive blending - it can be used to great effect and lends a certain style to an army. On the other hand, it starts to break down when you get up close to the figs or can trend towards making an army look more 'cartoony'. I've seen people leverage that to good effect and really embrace that and it works - but if you have a mix of figures that are painted more realistically and some that use the lining technique it can make your overall appearance suffer a bit from being disjointed. I've talked to/worked with paint judges in the past who love this look and some that hate it - it's a bit polarizing. For me, it's about making sure your army presents itself the way you want it to, so just be aware of the effect and make it work the way that makes you happy.

Great work!
avatar
Peyton said Sep 25, 2012 00:04:39
Greg: It'll be done sometime this/next year, that halberdier block is going to take forever!

Mike: Thanks!

Scott:I appreciate the constructive feedback! The reason I decided to paint the fevvers browns and then highlight up with greys and finally white is because I wanted to give them variation on more of a feather by feather basis, instead of the blocks of different colors I've seen on some models. I think between the grey white and black tips there's enough definition/color variation, but I'm very interested as to how you would suggest changing segments of the wings with washes. What washes would you use, and have you seen any good examples around?

Thanks!

Peyton
avatar
ScottMorgan said Sep 25, 2012 02:59:22
I think the place to give it a shot is in one or two of the rows of small feathers between the top edge of the wing and the pinion feathers. I really like the way you've worked the darker shade around the shaft of the pinions, and the black tips; as you said, the tracing does a really good job of picking out the feather shapes so I think you want to keep that where you can. Working the extra color variation into the small feather lines may require you to redo the tracery on those rows, but would be the smallest amount of rework on the one wing you've finished.

There are two approaches you might take with the washes - since you're going over brown, it will need to be going darker; it's not really feasible to go lighter without more repaint. So, you either stay in the same tonal range and just go darker or you pull in some color to give it more depth.

If you want to go darker you can either layer in a little Devlan Mud (or whatever that new Citidel shade equivalent is called), pushing the colors into the deep areas where the higher layer of feathers overlap. For my money, I'd use the Reaper brown liner and water it down and layer that in thin applications around the deep areas. I prefer the Reaper liner for two reasons: 1. I really like the way it becomes a nice shader when watered down and 2. the Reaper liner is a cool brown where the brown you're using is a warm brown so that contrast will give it more depth.

The second approach, and one I like better, is to go with color in shadow. A nice way to give a richer depth to your shadows is to use the color opposite of the color wheel - mixing colors opposite each other goes to black, but you get a vibrancy in the transition where the percentage of colors are unequal. So for a warm brown (which trends to red) you want a cool, dark green for the deepest contrast, but I'd suggest a blue-gray as it will be a softer blend and will work better tonally with the silvers in the armor. When using color, use very watered-thin layers - like 10 or 20% color to 80% water and build it up. It's a really beautiful trick when used gently, but you don't want to overdo it. I suggest picking some random other model with some nice depths in it, like a wavy cloak, and practice a bit with it to see how you like it. When you pick the color you're using, try to pick something that plays off another color in the mini if you can and go opposite the temperature (cold on warm and vice versa).

Let me know if all this makes sense of if you need more help and I'll be happy to do what I can. :)

Scott
avatar
ScottMorgan said Sep 25, 2012 15:07:47
Tried to get some pics that might help illustrate:

All the shading on this cloak is done with brick red, a dark warm color to contrast the cool blue of the cloak and also echo the red being using for the hood. The red on blue blends a deep purple into the deep recesses and leaves traces of the red in the shade.





When you look at shadows in real life, there's almost always reflected color in them even though we may not consciously notice it; but our brains are trained to expect it so when we just see darks in a model it can look a little off or not as natural to us even if we can't put our finger on it. It's just like anatomy - we have an instinctual understanding of what a person looks like so we immediately notice when something is out of proportion or not right, even if we can't describe it logically.

Hope that helps!

Scott
avatar
cb_rex said Sep 25, 2012 17:16:36
I'm looking forward to seeing the finished result with the Griffon, it's coming along really nicely, his beak and helmet are so pretty!
avatar
Peyton said Oct 07, 2012 13:36:19
Hey all,

Random painting update, still have 5 hours or so to go on the griffon, the fevvers on the body and the lion parts aren't finished yet :*(

Which is why I've got this goblin ninja painted up:




Lv.1 Heavens mage

"Oh shit, is it raining?"



Scott: Thanks for all the tips! I'm definitly going to try mixing two colors opposite eachother on the color wheel, I'll start rummaging through the bitz box to see if I have any models with flowy capes.

rex: Thanks! I'll have the griffon finished soon, I'll be back on that horse soon enough!

Cheers

Peyton
avatar
Greg2thePerson said Oct 07, 2012 14:25:40
I love the blue on that Ninja - how did you do it?

Heavens wizard is nice - did you gank that from Juicy Fruit's unfinished Hurricanum?
The slightly less beautiful host.
Login below to reply: